About trials in New Zealand

What is a clinical trial?

Every healthcare item available today has been through a clinical trial - even toothpaste!
Whenever a new healthcare item is developed - or an existing item is changed - it has to be tested. Items are tested to see if they work, and to make sure they are safe. Testing also helps to find out if a new item is better than what’s currently available. When healthcare items are tested, the testing process is called a clinical trial.

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How are clinical trials run?

All clinical trials are different, so it can be hard to describe exactly how it might work, however, every trial needs a research team, a place to conduct the research and a way to pay for it.

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Why be part of a clinical trial?

There are many different reasons as to why you may wish to join a clinical trial. Some people join to get access to a new treatment that is not currently available to them. Other people join because they want to help researchers learn more about a particular disease or condition.

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Who can take part in a clinical trial?

Almost anyone can take part in a clinical trial. Clinical trials can involve people of all ages, from children to the elderly. Trials can involve men and women, and people from a wide range of backgrounds. Clinical trials can involve people with all types and stages of a disease or condition. Trials can also involve people without a particular disease or condition.

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How do I find a clinical trial?

If you would like to know what clinical trials are currently taking place in New Zealand, you can use the search option on this website. You can also use this search option to find clinical trials for a particular condition or treatment. In addition, there are a number of other places you can go to start looking for a clinical trial.

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What happens when a trial is completed?

After a clinical trial is completed, the researchers examine all the information collected during the trial. This information is examined so that the researchers can find out what the results are. Examination of the information can take some time. This can be especially true with larger clinical trials that can involve thousands of people and take place over many years. Once the results are known, they are usually made available in reports or papers published in scientific journals.

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Why do we need clinical trials?

Clinical trials are a very important part of medical research.

Clinical trials make important scientific breakthroughs possible and help to detect, prevent, manage and cure a wide range of conditions and diseases.

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What are the different types of clinical trial?

There are many different types of clinical trials. The type of trial varies, depending on what the clinical trial is testing or trying to find out. The four main types are: treatment, prevention, screening and quality of life.

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What questions should I ask before joining a clinical trial?

During clinical trials, researchers collect information using scientific methods that are known to get the most reliable results. This means that the results of the study are as trustworthy as they can be. However, all clinical trials are different and you should be as well informed about the research as possible before taking part.

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What are the laws and ethics for clinical trials?

The running of clinical trials in New Zealand is regulated and controlled by law. All clinical trials available in New Zealand must obtain approval from a New Zealand ethics committee. Ethics committees review clinical trials to make sure they are safe and protect the rights of the individual.

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What are the potential risks and benefits?

The risks and benefits of taking part vary from trial to trial. They depend on the treatments and procedures involved. Before you decide to participate in a clinical trial, your doctor and the research team will explain the possible risks and benefits.

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